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STRV-1c
PROBA 1
Integral (IREM)
ROSETTA
GIOVE B
HERSCHEL
PLANCK
SREM

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STRV-1c

The DERA Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV) programme is a fast-track route to the in-orbit evaluation of new space technologies exploiting the varying altitudes and harsh environment of the Geo-synchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO).

The decision to develop and launch STRV 1 c&d follows the success of STRV 1 a&b - two DERA microsatellites which spent over four years in orbit. STRV 1 c&d will be launched in 2000 as auxiliary Ariane 5 payloads. Currently, a one year mission is being planned. However, the lessons learned from STRV 1 a&b indicate that there may well be a requirement to extend the mission and that will be an option.

SREM is one of the main payloads aboard STRV-1c.

Launch date: 15 November 2000
Orbit parameters:
Type GTO
Inclination 7 Degrees
Period 10.5 h
Perigee 250 km
Apogee 36000 km
NORAD Catalog Number: 26610

An unrecoverable problem with the spacecraft receivers caused the end of the mission one month after launch.



PROBA 1

PROBA 1 is a small autonomous satellite of 100 kg developed in the frame of the Technology Demonstration Program of the European Space Agency. The primary mission goal of PROBA 1 is to demonstrate satellite autonomy, in terms of on board resources management, on board failure handling, spacecraft operations and control and scientific data distribution. Technology will be demonstrated also in the area of advanced avionics, and advanced attitude and orbit control subsystem (hardware and software).

The secondary objectives of PROBA 1 are space environment investigation and earth observation. Three instruments have been selected, srem (Space Radiation Environment Monitor) for radiation measurement and DEBIE (DEBris In-orbit Evaluator) for debris detection and CHRIS (Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer), as main payload.

In February '98, the detailed design and development phase has started by an industrial consortium lead by Verhaert, with Spacebel, IMEC, SAS, SIL, IRE and SSF as subcontractors. The project will be realised within two year and launch is scheduled for mid 2001 on the Indian Polar Satellite Launch Verhicle into a sun synchronous near polar orbit.

Launch date: 22 October 2001
Orbit parameters:
Type sun synchronous
Inclination 98 Degrees
Period 97 min
Perigee 570 km
Apogee 640 km
NORAD Catalog Number: 26958




Integral (IREM)

INTEGRAL, the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory is the next ESA medium-size (M2) science mission. Launch will be in spring 2002 aboard a PROTON launcher, into a 72 hour eccentric orbit. It is dedicated to fine spectroscopy and imaging of hard X-ray and gamma-ray sources in the energy range 15 keV to 10 MeV.

IREM is the radiation environment monitoring system aboard INTEGRAL.

Launch date: 17 October 2002
Orbit parameters:
Type HEO
Inclination 51.6 Degrees
Period 72 h
Perigee 10 000 km
Apogee 152 700 km
NORAD Catalog Number: 27540




ROSETTA

The International Rosetta Mission was approved in November 1993 by ESA's Science Programme Committee as the Planetary Cornerstone Mission in ESA's long-term space science programme. The mission goal was initially set for a rendezvous with comet 46 P/Wirtanen. After its launch postponement it will now aim at Comet 67P/Churyumov- Gerasimenko. On its 10 year journey to the comet, the spacecraft will pass by at least one asteroid.

Rosetta will study the origin of comets, the relationship between cometary and interstellar material and its implications with regard to the origin of the Solar System.

An SREM aboard Rosetta will provide information on the high energetic radiation environment during the long journey.

Launch date: 2 March 2004
Orbit parameters:
Type Inteplanetary mission
Inclination
Period
Perigee
Apogee
NORAD Catalog Number: xxxxx




GIOVE B

GIOVE B is one of two satellites launched for in-orbit testing of critical technologies such as atomic clocks and novel navigation signals specifically developed for the Galileo programme . It will also secure the frequencies allocated to Galileo by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU).

These first two GIOVE satellites are elements of the In-Orbit Validation phase of the Galileo programme. GIOVE A and GIOVE B are designed to fulfil the following main objectives: secure frequency filings, validate key technologies such as rubidium clocks, characterise the orbital environment and deliver signal broadcasting using two transmission channels in parallel. GIOVE B is being developed by Galileo Industries, a European consortium comprising Alcatel Space Industries (F), Alenia Spazio (I), Astrium GmbH (D), Astrium Ltd (UK) and Galileo Sistemas y Servicios (E).

Launch date: April 26, 2008
Orbit parameters:
Type MEO
Inclination 56 Degrees
Period 14.1 h
Perigee 23 200 km
Apogee 23 200 km
NORAD Catalog Number: 32781




HERSCHEL

The European Space Agency's Herschel Space Observatory has the largest mirror ever built for a space telescope. At 3.5-metres in diameter the mirror will collect long-wavelength radiation from some of the coldest and most distant objects in the Universe. In addition, Herschel will be the only space observatory to cover a spectral range from the far infrared to sub-millimetre.

The objectives of this mission are to study the formation of galaxies in the early universe and their subsequent evolution, investigate the creation of stars and their interaction with the interstellar medium, to observe the chemical composition of the atmospheres and surfaces of comets, planets and satellites, and to examine the molecular chemistry of the universe.

Launch date: 14 May 2009
Orbit parameters:
Type Lissajous orbit about L2
Inclination
Period
Perigee
Apogee
NORAD Catalog Number: xxxxx




PLANCK

The European Space Agency's satellite Planck will help provide answers to one of the most important sets of questions asked in modern science - how did the Universe begin, how did it evolve to the state we observe today, and how will it continue to evolve in the future?

Planck's objective is to analyse, with the highest accuracy ever achieved, the remnants of the radiation that filled the Universe immediately after the Big Bang, which we observe today as the Cosmic Microwave Background.

Launch date: 14 May 2009
Orbit parameters:
Type Lissajous orbit about L2
Inclination
Period
Perigee
Apogee
NORAD Catalog Number: xxxxx